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Site Administrator — 18 Jul 2013

RIPE Atlas Update: DNSMON Code Available, LatencyMON Comparisons, New Credit Sharing and More

In the past few months, we've added some new features and functionality to RIPE Atlas, including making the DNSMON code available on GitHub for personal use, displaying IPv4 vs IPv6 comparisons in LatencyMON, new credit sharing options, and new limits on probes per measurement and results per day. Learn more about the latest updates - and don't forget to tell us what you think.

RIPE Atlas Update: DNSMON Code Available, LatencyMON Comparisons, New Credit Sharing and More - Read More…

Support for Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in DNS Resolvers as Seen by RIPE Atlas

The Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is becoming increasingly popular in DNSSEC. While it is sometimes considered to be a remedy for the low DNSSEC adoption rate, there is also a lot of controversy around it. One of the main concerns is that DNSSEC-validating resolvers don't always make use of ECC. We used RIPE Atlas to measure the support for ECC in DNS resolvers.

Support for Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in DNS Resolvers as Seen by RIPE Atlas - Read More…

10,000 LIRs with IPv6 Resources

This week, the RIPE NCC saw a milestone as the 10,000th Local Internet Registry (LIR) received IPv6 addresses. The first block of IPv6 addresses was allocated from IANA to the RIPE NCC in 1999, so we have been distributing IPv6 addresses for 17 years. In those years we have seen interesting policy developments, making it easier for LIRs to obtain enough IPv6 to satisfy their needs. In this article we track the policy developments that have made it progressively easier for LIRs to get the IPv6 they need.

10,000 LIRs with IPv6 Resources - Read More…

On the Internet, Everyone is Connected to Everyone Else. Right?

We tend to make a number of assumptions about the Internet, and sometimes these assumptions don’t always stand up to critical analysis. We were perhaps ‘trained’ by the claims of the telephone service to believe that these communications networks supported a model of universal connectivity. Any telephone handset could establish a call with any other telephone handset was the underlying model of a ubiquitous telephone service, and we’ve carried that assumption into our perception of the Internet. On the Internet anyone can communicate with anyone else – right?

On the Internet, Everyone is Connected to Everyone Else. Right? - Read More…

The Revamped RIPE Atlas Website

RIPE Atlas has been in operation for more than five years now, and its network of probes and users has grown tremendously in that time. We’ve also added anchors, sponsors and ambassadors to the system, developed a huge array of new tools, visualisations and features, and RIPE Atlas data is now being used by network operators, engineers and researchers around the world. As a result, we thought it was time to revamp the RIPE Atlas website, which hadn’t changed much over the past five years despite all the changes to RIPE Atlas itself. Get an overview of some of the biggest changes and new features - then check out the new site, which launches today!

The Revamped RIPE Atlas Website - Read More…

RIPE Atlas Year in Review 2015

RIPE Atlas had another successful year in 2015, thanks in large part to all our users, hosts, sponsors, ambassadors and other community members. Here we take a look back at some of the achievements we reached together, the new features we implemented, key facts and figures - and offer a sneak peek of what you can expect in 2016.

RIPE Atlas Year in Review 2015 - Read More…

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