Interesting Graphs - Priming Queries to the Root Servers

Emile Aben — Apr 28, 2010 11:10 AM
Filed under: , , ,
There was a slight increase in the number of sources that issue priming queries to DNS root servers seen on 18 March 2010, right after the introduction of a signed .arpa zone. See here an analysis and some graphs.

I looked a bit more at the slight increase in the number of sources that issue priming queries to DNS root servers I saw on 18 March, right after the introduction of a signed .arpa zone. The short summary is that I didn't find anything conclusive.

The increase I saw was caused by a couple of K-root nodes and was most visible on the AMS-IX (Amsterdam, Netherlands) node and the MIX (Milan, IT) node, but not on all nodes. For the AMS-IX and MIX node I found that the increase was caused by sources that had an IP TTL between 64 and 128, and these sources didn't have EDNS, so no DNSSEC capabilities.

I looked at priming queries collected by others as part of DNS-OARC . For the aggregate of root server nodes that data was available for, there is no increase in number of sources sending priming queries per day (Figure 1).

 

 

Figure 1: Number of priming queried to root-servers
 

When looking at the individual instances of specific root servers, in some cases you can see an increase (L-root), a decrease (E-root), or no change (D-root, H-root) around 18 March.

So at this point the most likely explanation for the increase of sources issuing priming queries to K-root that we reported earlier, is that some population of resolvers started to query K-root a bit more often, relative to the other root servers.

Below are some IMHO aesthetically pleasing pictures of the number of sources issuing priming queries to root server nodes, relative to the average for the specific node over the period that is plotted (2010-03-11 - 2010-03-29).

 

 

Figure 2: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, for all root server nodes that uploaded data to DNS-OARC

 

 

 

Figure 3: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, A-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 4: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, C-root nodes highlighted
 

 

 

Figure 5: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, D-root node highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 6: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, E-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 
Figure 7: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, F-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 8: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, G-root nodes highlighted
 

 

 

Figure 9: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, H-root node highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 10: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, J-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 11: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, K-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 12: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, L-root nodes highlighted

 

 

 

Figure 13: Number of sources issuing priming queries relative to the average, M-root nodes highlighted

 

0 Comments

Add comment

You can add a comment by filling out the form below. Only plain text is possible. Web and email addresses will be transformed into clickable links. Comments are moderated so they won't appear immediately.

Navigation
Related Items
Visualising Bandwidth Capacity and Network Activity in RIPEstat Using M-Lab Data

As a result of the cooperation between the RIPE NCC and Measurement Lab (M-Lab), you can now ...

RIPEstat 2013 Year in Review

RIPEstat users saw a lot of changes throughout 2013, from support for new query types, such as ...

Internet Disruptions in Sudan

Significant Internet disruptions are happening in Sudan, possibly as a reaction to riots. We use ...

IPv6 RIPEness - Implementing the Fifth Star

In this article we present the first publicly available beta version of the fifth IPv6 RIPEness ...

Using RIPE Atlas: A DENIC Case Study

When we experienced an occasional operational issue with the data returned by one of our name ...

more ...