Geoff Huston

Counting IPv6 in the DNS

Geoff Huston
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At the recent ARIN XXX meeting in October 2012 I listened to a debate on a policy proposal concerning the reservation of a pool of IPv4 addresses to address critical infrastructure. The term "critical infrastructure" is intended to cover a variety of applications, including use by public Internet Exchanges and authoritative name servers for various top level domains. As far as I can tell, the assumptions behind this policy proposal includes the assumption that a top level authoritative name server will need to use IPv4 for the foreseeable future, so that an explicit reserved pool of these IPv4 addresses needs to be maintained for use by the authoritative name servers for these domain names.


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About the author

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at APNIC, where he undertakes research on topics associated with Internet infrastructure, IP technologies, and address distribution policies. From 1995 to 2005, Geoff was the Chief Internet Scientist at Telstra, where he provided a leading role in the construction and further development of Telstra's Internet service offerings, both in Australia and as part of Telstra's global operations. Prior to Telstra, Mr Huston worked for the Australian National University, where he led the initial construction of the Internet in Australia in the late 1980s as the Technical Manager of the Australian Academic and Research Network. He has authored a number of books dealing with IP technology, as well as numerous papers and columns. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1999 until 2005 and served as its Executive Director from 2001 to 2005. He is an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force, where he currently chairs two Working Groups. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Internet Society from 1992 until 2001 and served a term as Chair of the Board in 1999. He has served on the Board of the Public Internet Registry and also on the Executive Council of APNIC. He chaired the Internet Engineering and Planning Group from 1992 until 2005.

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