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Geoff Huston

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About the author

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at APNIC, where he undertakes research on topics associated with Internet infrastructure, IP technologies, and address distribution policies. From 1995 to 2005, Geoff was the Chief Internet Scientist at Telstra, where he provided a leading role in the construction and further development of Telstra's Internet service offerings, both in Australia and as part of Telstra's global operations. Prior to Telstra, Mr Huston worked for the Australian National University, where he led the initial construction of the Internet in Australia in the late 1980s as the Technical Manager of the Australian Academic and Research Network. He has authored a number of books dealing with IP technology, as well as numerous papers and columns. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1999 until 2005 and served as its Executive Director from 2001 to 2005. He is an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force, where he currently chairs two Working Groups. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Internet Society from 1992 until 2001 and served a term as Chair of the Board in 1999. He has served on the Board of the Public Internet Registry and also on the Executive Council of APNIC. He chaired the Internet Engineering and Planning Group from 1992 until 2005.

Is Big Necessarily Bad?

Why did a network technology such as the Internet, designed to pass control away from the central network to the connected devices, succumb to the level of centrality we see today? In this guest post, Geoff Huston shares his thoughts on the topic of centrality.

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Internet Economics is a Thing and we Need to Take Note

In this article I talk about consolidation, the fact that more and more data traffic goes ‘dark’ and the importance of open measurement platforms and open data sets. We need public measurements that are impartial, accurate, comprehensive and of course unbiased as an essential precondition for the f…

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Is the Internet Running Late?

Computers have always had clocks. Well maybe not clocks as you might think, but digital computers have always had oscillators, and if you hook the oscillator to a simple counter then you have a clock.

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Has Internet Governance Become Irrelevant?

A panel session has been scheduled at the forthcoming Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Paris in November that speaks to the topic that Internet Governance is on a path to irrelevance. What's this all about?

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DOH! DNS over HTTPS explained

If you had the opportunity to re-imagine the DNS, what might it look like? Normally this would be an idle topic of speculation over a beer or two, but maybe there’s a little more to the question these days. We are walking into an entirely new world of the DNS when we start to think about what exact…

dns
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Measuring the KSK Roll

When viewed as a network infrastructure, looks can be very deceiving when looking at the DNS. It appears to be a simple collection of resolvers and servers. Clients pass their DNS name resolution queries to resolvers, who then identify and ask an appropriate authoritative name server to resolve …

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An Update on Securing BGP

One way or another we’ve been working on various aspects of securing the Internet’s inter-domain routing system for many years.

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The Uncertainty of Measuring the DNS

The period around the end of the nineteenth century and the start of the twentieth century saw a number of phenomenal advances in the physical sciences.

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Looking Back at the Internet’s Past Decade

In this article I am looking a some fundamental developments on the Internet over the last decade. Nothing much has changed - or has it?

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What Drives IPv6 Deployment?

It’s been almost seven years since World IPv6 Launch day on 6 June 2011 (*). In those seven years, we’ve managed to place ever-increasing pressure on the dwindling pools of available IPv4 addresses, but we have still been unable to complete the transition to an all-IPv6 Internet.

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