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Geoff Huston

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at APNIC, where he undertakes research on topics associated with Internet infrastructure, IP technologies, and address distribution policies. From 1995 to 2005, Geoff was the Chief Internet Scientist at Telstra, where he provided a leading role in the construction and further development of Telstra's Internet service offerings, both in Australia and as part of Telstra's global operations. Prior to Telstra, Mr Huston worked for the Australian National University, where he led the initial construction of the Internet in Australia in the late 1980s as the Technical Manager of the Australian Academic and Research Network. He has authored a number of books dealing with IP technology, as well as numerous papers and columns. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1999 until 2005 and served as its Executive Director from 2001 to 2005. He is an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force, where he currently chairs two Working Groups. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Internet Society from 1992 until 2001 and served a term as Chair of the Board in 1999. He has served on the Board of the Public Internet Registry and also on the Executive Council of APNIC. He chaired the Internet Engineering and Planning Group from 1992 until 2005.

Pages created by Geoff Huston

Dealing with IPv6 Fragmentation in the DNS
Dealing with IPv6 Fragmentation in the DNS
Geoff Huston — 23 Aug 2017

The IPv6 protocol introduced very few changes to its IPv4 predecessor. The major change was of course the expansion of the size of the IP source and destination address fields in the packet header from 32-bits to 128-bits. There were, however, some other changes that apparently were intended to subtly alter IP behaviour. One of these was the change in treatment of packet fragmentation.… Read more

Tags: ipv6 dns
BGP More Specifics: Routing Vandalism or Useful?
BGP More Specifics: Routing Vandalism or Useful?
Geoff Huston — 27 Jun 2017

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is the routing protocol that keeps the Internet glued together. The public Internet is composed of some 58,000 component networks (BGP calls them “Autonomous Systems” [AS’s]), many of which are very small, while some are very large both in terms of geographical coverage and numbers of users.… Read more

Tags: routing
BBR TCP
BBR TCP
Geoff Huston — 05 May 2017

The Internet was built using an architectural principle of a simple network and agile edges. The basic approach was to assume that the network is a simple collection of buffered switches and circuits. As packets traverse the network they are effectively passed from switch to switch. … Read more

Look Up!
Look Up!
Geoff Huston — 07 Apr 2017

Far from being a vibrant environment with an array of competitive offerings, the activity of providing so-called “last mile” Internet access appears to have been reduced to an environment where, in many markets, a small number of access providers appear to operate in a manner that resembles a cosy cartel, strenuously resisting the imposition of harsher strictures of true competition.… Read more

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