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Geoff Huston

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at APNIC, where he undertakes research on topics associated with Internet infrastructure, IP technologies, and address distribution policies. From 1995 to 2005, Geoff was the Chief Internet Scientist at Telstra, where he provided a leading role in the construction and further development of Telstra's Internet service offerings, both in Australia and as part of Telstra's global operations. Prior to Telstra, Mr Huston worked for the Australian National University, where he led the initial construction of the Internet in Australia in the late 1980s as the Technical Manager of the Australian Academic and Research Network. He has authored a number of books dealing with IP technology, as well as numerous papers and columns. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1999 until 2005 and served as its Executive Director from 2001 to 2005. He is an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force, where he currently chairs two Working Groups. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Internet Society from 1992 until 2001 and served a term as Chair of the Board in 1999. He has served on the Board of the Public Internet Registry and also on the Executive Council of APNIC. He chaired the Internet Engineering and Planning Group from 1992 until 2005.

Pages created by Geoff Huston

The QoS Emperor's Wardrobe
Geoff Huston — 24 Jun 2012

In the process of revising the International Telecommunications Regulations, it has been suggested to base a new IP interconnection framework on the concept of end-to-end Quality of Service. This raises a question in my head: How "real" is end-to-end Quality of Service in the Internet?… Read more

Tags: policy
Detecting IP Address Filters
Geoff Huston — 13 Jan 2012

Until recently IP network operators were encouraged to set up so-called "bogon address filters" at the edge of their networks. These filters were intended to discard all incoming traffic where the source address in the IP header was from a block of addresses that was known to be unallocated. The inference was that a matching packet was either an unintentional leak from some privately addressed network domain or was generated using source address spoofing. In either case there is no point in delivering the packet, since it comes from a demonstrably fictitious source.… Read more

Dual Stack Esotropia
Geoff Huston — 30 Nov 2011

The introduction of a second IP protocol into the Internet presents many technical issues, and in previous columns we've explored many of the issues related to network engineering and infrastructure. In this column I'd like to head upward in the protocol stack to the rarefied air way up there at the level of the application, and look at how applications are managing to cope with the issue of two IP stacks.… Read more

Tags: ipv6