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One Year of RIPEstat
One Year of RIPEstat
Christian Teuschel — 08 Feb 2012

In December 2010, RIPEstat, the RIPE NCC's "one-stop shop" for Internet-related information, was released in its first beta version. With the start of a new year - marking RIPEstat's first year in action - it is a good time to briefly recap 2011.

IPv4 Address Space Growth per Country
IPv4 Address Space Growth per Country
Emile Aben — 06 Feb 2012

With the depletion of the IPv4 free pool in the APNIC region and the imminent IPv4 free pool run out in the RIPE NCC's service region, it is interesting to look at IPv4 allocation rates per country to see where free pool run out has and will have the most consequences, in terms of curtailing growth of IPv4 address usage. In this article, we try to visualise where "the pressure is on" the most.

RIPEstat Demo - s2e01
RIPEstat Demo - s2e01
Ann Barcomb — 24 Jan 2012

The first RIPEstat demo for 2012 was released on Tuesday, 24 January. The presentation highlighted new developments involving the widget API, the data API, the web application architecture, and performance monitoring and improvement.

Presenting the New RIPEstat Demo Format
Ann Barcomb — 24 Jan 2012

We are introducing a new format and numbering scheme (season and episode rather than demo number) with the first RIPEstat demo of 2012. With this change, we want to preserve what has been effective - live demos at RIPE meetings and videos of our regular demos - while replacing elements which have been less successful.

2011 Audit Results
2011 Audit Results
Mirjam Kühne — 19 Jan 2012

The RIPE NCC preforms audits of the Local Internet Registries contact data and resource registration data maintained by the LIR. In 2011 around 400 audits were opened and as of 17 January 2012 270 have been completed. In this article you can find some statistics and results of these audits.

Detecting IP Address Filters
Geoff Huston — 13 Jan 2012

Until recently IP network operators were encouraged to set up so-called "bogon address filters" at the edge of their networks. These filters were intended to discard all incoming traffic where the source address in the IP header was from a block of addresses that was known to be unallocated. The inference was that a matching packet was either an unintentional leak from some privately addressed network domain or was generated using source address spoofing. In either case there is no point in delivering the packet, since it comes from a demonstrably fictitious source.

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