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RIPE Atlas

Mihnea-Costin Grigore — Oct 2010
This page contains all information related to the active measurements network, RIPE Atlas.

Learn more about the RIPE Atlas active measurements network.

You can also find a collection of use cases, reviews and other articles written by RIPE Atlas users.

Troubleshooting RIPE Atlas Probes: USB Sticks
Troubleshooting RIPE Atlas Probes: USB Sticks
Philip Homburg — 04 Jul 2016

Some of the third version of RIPE Atlas probes have recently had an issue with their USB sticks. We're investigating what may be causing this issue and have a possible solution, outlined below. (At the same time, we're also looking into a new hardware solution for the future.) If you've had trouble with your probe, please follow these simple steps. RIPE Atlas users everywhere will thank you for getting your probe back online - and we will, too!

Anycast vs. DDoS - Evaluating the November 2015 Root DNS Event
Anycast vs. DDoS - Evaluating the November 2015 Root DNS Event
Giovane Moura — 31 May 2016

IP anycast has been widely used to replicate services in multiple locations as a way to deliver better performance and resilience. It has been largely employed by CDNs and DNS operators, such as on the root server system. However, there is little evaluation of anycast under stress.

A Visual Impression of Probe Lifetimes
A Visual Impression of Probe Lifetimes
Philip Homburg — 25 May 2016

For a while now, the number of active RIPE Atlas probes has hovered around the 9,400 mark. This means that new probes are being connected at a fast enough rate to replace failing probes, but not enough to grow the network. At the same time, the version 3 probes have problems with their USB sticks. This led us to wonder whether these two issues are related.

There is Gold in this Stream - Sifting Through Used RIPE Atlas Traceroute Results
There is Gold in this Stream - Sifting Through Used RIPE Atlas Traceroute Results
Daniel Karrenberg — 20 May 2016

This work demonstrates the value of the results collected by RIPE Atlas independent of the original purpose for collecting them. Using all traceroute results from a particular day as an example, we first show that near real-time analysis of the result stream is feasible. Then we show that this has great potential for studying the packet layer of the Internet in general and for providing tools to network operators in particular. All this suggests a large and diverse potential for further work.

Connectivity in the LAC Region
Connectivity in the LAC Region
Mirjam Kühne — 03 May 2016

Please enjoy this guest post by Agustín Formoso, Software Developer at LACNIC: Regional connectivity is not an easy metric to measure. To do it properly you need measurements generated by multiple vantage points, located in as many places as possible (both geographically and logically). Besides, connectivity is not something strictly defined, as it has no standard definition (as opposed to many metrics we use in today’s Internet).

How Elasticsearch and Kibana Help us Analyse RIPE Atlas Data Logs
How Elasticsearch and Kibana Help us Analyse RIPE Atlas Data Logs
Andreas Strikos — 29 Apr 2016

RIPE Atlas back-end applications run on more than 40 servers. Each day these machines can produce thousands of application logs of any kind of severity level. In order to be able to track down serious errors, warnings or even unusual behaviour, we decided some time ago to try Elasticsearch as a logging sink. In this article we will look at the design of such a system and describe how we can easily make sense from an ocean of logs.

How Pingable are the Pingables?
How Pingable are the Pingables?
Rene Wilhelm — 05 Apr 2016

In February 2011 the RIPE NCC implemented the "pingable:" and "ping-hdl:" attributes in the RIPE Database. These attributes were added to the Routing Policy Specification Language by RFC 5943 to allow networks to advertise IP addresses that are reachable and can be used as a target for diagnostic tests. Five years later we check how the new attributes have been adopted and how reachable the pingable addresses registered in the RIPE Database are when pinged from RIPE Atlas.

RIPE Atlas Update: DNSMON Code Available, LatencyMON Comparisons, New Credit Sharing and More
RIPE Atlas Update: DNSMON Code Available, LatencyMON Comparisons, New Credit Sharing and More
Suzanne Taylor Muzzin — 30 Mar 2016

In the past few months, we've added some new features and functionality to RIPE Atlas, including making the DNSMON code available on GitHub for personal use, displaying IPv4 vs IPv6 comparisons in LatencyMON, new credit sharing options, and new limits on probes per measurement and results per day. Learn more about the latest updates - and don't forget to tell us what you think.

Support for Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in DNS Resolvers as Seen by RIPE Atlas
Support for Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in DNS Resolvers as Seen by RIPE Atlas
Maciej Andzinski — 21 Mar 2016

The Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is becoming increasingly popular in DNSSEC. While it is sometimes considered to be a remedy for the low DNSSEC adoption rate, there is also a lot of controversy around it. One of the main concerns is that DNSSEC-validating resolvers don't always make use of ECC. We used RIPE Atlas to measure the support for ECC in DNS resolvers.

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